Mulholland Legend 480 is a carbon fiber sports car penned by an ex-TVR designer

A British company that specializes in composite materials has announced plans for a lightweight sports car.

Mulholland, based in Derby, United Kingdom, supplies carbon fiber components to multiple industries, including Formula One, and is now expanding into the automotive division with its own car arm. The goal of the project is to highlight the company’s capabilities which have been honed over the past two decades.

The first product will be the Legend 480—a carbon fiber sports car with an almost brutalist design penned by former TVR designer Damian Mctaggart. If you squint, there are just enough references to link the Legend 480 with the TVR Tuscan Speed Six, which Mctaggart also penned.

2004 TVR Tuscan

The “480” in the name is a reference to the 480 horsepower generated by a V-8 engine that will power the car. The engine will sit in a front-midship position and power the rear wheels

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Buying a New Car vs. Buying a Used Car

To compare the costs of leasing, buying new and buying used, we’ll use a popular vehicle in our examples: a compact SUV. Most owners in the U.S. keep their new and used vehicles for 79 months — just over 6.5 years That’s the length of ownership we are assuming here. To match that period, we are basing the leasing example on two back-to-back three-year leases, totaling 72 months. You can see the other assumptions behind these examples at the end of the story:

Leasing: The average lease cost is based on a compact SUV that sells for $28,863 and has drive-off fees of $2,246. For the lease’s interest rate, better known as the money factor, we’ve used the average amount: 0.001127. This results in a $356 monthly payment for three years. We used the same numbers for the second three-year lease.

Buying New: The average amount financed for a

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A Brief History of the Volkswagen Golf GTI, Everyone’s Favorite Hot Hatch

Rule No. 1 of automotive history is to avoid calling any car or technology a “first,” because it often turns out that somewhere in time, someone already did it at least once. So, when Volkswagen cheekily led off its recent media presentation of the new, upcoming eighth-generation Golf GTI with the words, “Since 1976: The forgery-proof original,” it was sure to reignite fierce debates. The perfect opportunity, then, to take a brief look at Volkswagen Golf GTI history.

Wikipedia, often the knee-jerk go-to source for armchair know-it-alls, says the Renault 5 Alpine “launched two months before the original Volkswagen Golf GTI.” The 1972 AMC Gremlin X hatchback, with its 150-horsepower, 304-cubic-inch (5.0-liter) two-barrel V-8 beat the VW by at least four years, though the German car’s marketing later defined “hot hatch” as a “sporty, front-wheel-drive compact … “

But then there’s the Austin Mini Cooper S of 1963. True,

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