Suki and Johnny Tran’s Honda S2000s in “The Fast and Furious” movies were the same car

The Honda S2000s driven by Johnny Tran and Suki in “The Fast and the Furious” and “2 Fast 2 Furious,” respectively, may look different, but don’t let the paint jobs fool you. They were actually the same car, Craig Lieberman, a technical advisor on both films, has revealed.

Like many of the cars in “The Fast and the Furious,” Tran’s S2000 was rented from a real-life owner (who had a cameo in the movie driving a white Civic). The car wore different wheels and graphics for its on-screen appearance.

After filming of the first movie was completed, the car was given a supercharger kit, boosting output from 240 horsepower to around 350 hp, according to Lieberman. Other modifications included an HKS exhaust system and suspension, and an RE Works strut tower bar, he said. It was repainted blue, and then orange, after filming.

Honda S2000 from ‘2 Fast 2 Furious’

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What New Car Fees Should You Pay?

Footnotes:

1. Maximum sales tax: Often you pay a combination of state, county and local taxes. This is the estimated maximum tax you should be charged, depending on which city you live in. The sales tax rates were sourced from sales-tax automation company Avalara.

2. Average DMV fees: The typical amount it will cost to register a new vehicle in your state.

3. Trade-in sales tax credit? A “Y” in this column means that you will pay sales tax only on the difference between your new car purchase and the value of your trade-in. An “N” in the column signifies that you will pay tax on the full amount of your new car purchase.

4. Are incentives taxed? A “Y” in this column indicates that the buyer will pay tax on the purchase price before the manufacturer rebate is applied.

5. Doc fee limits: This will tell you if

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Virtual Reality in Car Design at Ford: Joel Piaskowski Interview

Time waits for no car design. Even as the COVID-19 pandemic stalls executive offices and assembly plants alike, designers and engineers have to keep their current programs on track, and simultaneously anticipate what kinds of cars and trucks consumers will want to buy when this is all over.

Automobile: Every auto automaker is in a position now where there’s the potential for product delays. Are we looking at a one-to-one offset where, say, a vehicle that was supposed to make its debut in six months now is delayed by two or three months?

Joel Piaskowski: I’m not at liberty to discuss future programs, but there is news Ford has announced that some of the programs are being delayed. And it’s basically a month-for-month slip.

What’s it like to rely on virtual reality equipment to design cars and crossovers?

JP: We had never done VR at home.

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