The 2022 Jeep Grand Wagoneer Won’t Have These Nutty Features From the Concept

  • Not all features from the Grand Wagoneer Concept will make it to the final production model.
  • Here are the features most likely to be on the chopping block.

It’s not hyperbolic to say that when Jeep pulled the wraps off the Jeep Grand Wagoneer concept, it changed the automotive landscape — and, indeed, the world — forever. OK, maybe there’s a bit of hyperbole in that statement, but it was interesting nonetheless to see Jeep take a swing at high-end vehicle design. It certainly did a better job than whatever Buick is attempting with the Avenir.

But the Grand Wagoneer concept is just that — a concept, meaning that not all of its glitz and glamour will make it to the final model. Here are the features and details that you probably won’t see on the production version — the actual 2022 Jeep Grand Wagoneer.

Dot Matrix LEDs

The Grand

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How to pull off the perfect lap around the Nürburgring

The Nürburgring Nordschleife is one of the world’s most challenging racetracks but, because it’s also technically a public toll road, it’s also one of the easiest to get access to. If you’re planning a trip to the ‘Ring, you won’t find a more comprehensive guide than this video.

Over a run time of nearly three hours, driving coach Scott Mansell (no relation to Formula One champion Nigel Mansell), and Nürburgring 24 Hours winner Adam Christo break down the track in excruciating detail. There’s plenty of in-car footage, and timestamps for specific corners and sections—right down to pit entry.

Learning a new track always requires a detailed breakdown of things like the correct line and braking points, but with the Nordschleife, there’s a lot more information to take in. The circuit is 12.9 miles long, with dozens of corners. The official total is 73, but other sources claims there are up

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The Jaguar XJ: History, Generations, Specifications

Jaguar XJ Essential History

Series 1 Jaguar XJs represent the cleanest, most basic approach to the model with svelte chrome bumpers, a large front grille and other classic styling elements. Launched with Jaguar’s straight-six XK engine, as used in the Jaguar E-type, the XJ was initially available in 2.8- and 4.2-liter capacities. In 1972, a 5.3-liter V-12 engine was offered for the first time, along with a long-wheelbase variant that provided more legroom for rear-seat passengers. Automatic three-speed transmissions from Borg-Warner were employed.

In 1973 the Series 2 Jaguar XJ arrived, updated just slightly for new U.S. bumper requirements. Bumpers were made larger with rubber inserts and the front grille was reduced in size to compensate. Additionally, a new 3.4-liter straight-six became available and starting in 1974, the XJ sedan was only available in the long-wheelbase configuration. The short-wheelbase chassis became a basis for the XJ two-door coupe

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