Ford F-250 Tremor vs. Ram Power Wagon: Off-Roading, Price, Specs & More

Price Comparison: Ford F-250 Tremor vs. Ram Power Wagon

Taking into account the impressive off-road performance that both these trucks offer, the Power Wagon and the Tremor give you pretty good value. Their base prices are similar: $50,040 for the Ram and $53,820 for the Ford in their most basic versions. Both prices include destination.

The most cost-effective way to build a Power Wagon is to choose a base-level Ram 2500 Crew Cab Tradesman (with 4WD and the short bed) and add the Power Wagon package to it at a $7,995 premium. This brings the total price to $50,040. If you’re looking for more than the most basic version, though, the Power Wagon is usually sold with the equivalent equipment of a Laramie trim level. Its starting price is $55,045, and includes a power-adjustable driver’s seat, 8.4-inch touchscreen and more features that don’t come on the Tradesman.

Our Power Wagon

Read More View More Ford F-250 Tremor vs. Ram Power Wagon: Off-Roading, Price, Specs & More

Save Up to $9,319 on New Cars, Trucks and SUVs in August

Top Car, Truck and SUV Discounts for August

Looking for a deal on a new car? We’ve rounded up the cars, trucks and SUVs with the biggest discounts on dealer lots this month. No one wants to pay sticker price, and this list will tell you at a glance which models will save you the most money off MSRP.

We combed through all of our data to find out what kind of discounts dealers are offering on vehicles in stock now. Then we picked the most discounted models to help you save the most money.

Not all buyers will necessarily qualify for all discounts, and offers may vary depending on where you live.

Source link Read More

View More Save Up to $9,319 on New Cars, Trucks and SUVs in August

2020 Jeep Wrangler: Iconic Style and Capability

Fun to Drive

In today’s world, technology plays a dominant role in our lives, and we rely on it to provide us with information and entertainment. This is true whether we’re at work or at play. It’s also true when we’re behind the wheel.

The Wrangler comes with an arsenal of tech features built to make life more pleasant for you and your passengers. Also, this Jeep makes it easy for you to stay connected when you’re on the road, seamlessly integrating with your smartphone. At the heart of it all is the Wrangler’s available Uconnect 8.4-inch touchscreen, an interface that gives you access to a wealth of amenities.

Of course, a vehicle’s fun-to-drive quotient is measured by more than just the quality of its technology. You also have to consider how well it performs in various driving situations, and the Wrangler is versatile enough to shine in diverse scenarios.

Read More View More 2020 Jeep Wrangler: Iconic Style and Capability

Honda Civic Type R vs. Mini John Cooper Works GP

0-60 Times and Top Speed: Civic Type R vs. Mini John Cooper Works GP

Edmunds has a private test facility where we independently verify the performance claims of the manufacturers. We tested both the Mini and the Honda on the same day and in the same conditions.

First, the Mini. Our test car accelerated from 0 to 60 mph in just 5.1 seconds and cleared the quarter-mile in 13.2 seconds at a speed of 108.5 mph. These are outstanding figures for a front-wheel-drive hatchback.

For the Civic Type R, we recorded a 0-60 mph sprint in 5.7 seconds and a quarter-mile time of 13.8 seconds at 103.6 mph. For straight-line speed, the Mini is the clear winner here.

In our 60-0 mph brake tests, the Mini stopped marginally more quickly than the Honda, requiring 105 feet versus 107. On the skidpad, however, the situation was reversed. The Civic generated 1.03

Read More View More Honda Civic Type R vs. Mini John Cooper Works GP

Retro Off-Roader Design Battle: Bronco vs. Wrangler vs. Defender

Land Rover Defender

The Land Rover Defender’s heritage can be traced back to the early Land Rover Series 1, 2 and 3. These models were originally developed for agricultural and commercial purposes in postwar Britain. Like the Jeep, they were simple and rugged. In the 1980s, the Defender came on the scene with the squared-off style that many of us have come to love.

The two main versions — the Defender 90 and the longer 110 — were only offered in the U.S. for a few years. This rarity helps explain why they’ve been considered by off-road enthusiasts as forbidden fruit. A bare-bones attitude, with exposed rivets and sharp corners, had a charm all its own.

The Defender underwent its only true redesign last year. It’s a more modern reinterpretation rather than an evolution. It’s softer in its style, which might be a disappointment to the Defender loyalists, but it

Read More View More Retro Off-Roader Design Battle: Bronco vs. Wrangler vs. Defender