The All-New 2020 Ford Bronco Is Back in a 2- and 4-Door Model

The return of the Ford Bronco is the cause for much celebration, partially because this new SUV has something for everyone. Its retro-inspired styling invokes warm feelings from those with fond memories of previous Broncos, while its off-road credentials appeal to enthusiasts who have been waiting decades for a true competitor to the Jeep Wrangler and Toyota 4Runner. Even buyers who will realistically keep their tires on pavement are entranced by the rugged design, modern interior and wealth of advanced safety features.

With a launch date in the spring of next year, there technically will not be a 2020 Ford Bronco. The Bronco will instead debut as a 2021 model-year vehicle. A smaller, Escape-based crossover called the Bronco Sport will debut later this year, but like its big brother, it will also be a 2021 vehicle. We maintain separate Bronco and Bronco Sport pages with all the latest info on those production models.

Now that we have the semantics out of the way, let’s take a look at what the new Bronco has to offer.

2020 Ford Bronco Price: How Much Is the New Ford Bronco?

Available in two- and four-door body styles, the new Ford Bronco will initially be sold in seven trim levels. All prices include destination and handling charges.

Base Bronco (two-door costs $29,995; four-door costs $34,695): The entry-level model will simply be called “Bronco” and is fairly basic, but you do get useful features including four-wheel drive, a two-speed transfer case, tow hooks, several traction modes and 30-inch tires. Like most Broncos, it’s driven by a turbocharged four-cylinder engine with 270 horsepower on tap, with a standard seven-speed manual transmission or an optional 10-speed automatic.

Yes, we said seven-speed manual — the new Bronco can be shifted like an old-school off-roader if the buyer is so inclined. Alas, the optional twin-turbo V6 engine, which will surely appeal to performance enthusiasts, is automatic-only, at least for now.

Big Bend (two-door costs $34,880; four-door costs $37,375): Chief upgrades include larger, 32-inch alloy wheels (instead of the base model’s steel wheels) with all-terrain tires, an additional traction mode and a dark gray grille.

Black Diamond (two-door costs $37,545; four-door costs $40,040): Includes off-road-themed additions inside and out. Heavy-duty bumpers, rock rails, skid plates, auxiliary switches, a rubberized floor and vinyl upholstery are all included, and the wheels revert back to steelies.

Outer Banks (two-door costs $40,490; four-door costs $42,945): Builds off the Big Bend model, adding black-painted alloy wheels, LED headlights, body-colored exterior accents, heated front seats and the lower trims’ Mid package.

Badlands (two-door costs $43,590; four-door costs $46,085): Builds off the Big Bend model but includes many of the Black Diamond’s features. Also adds a more advanced 4WD system, a disconnecting front stabilizer bar and 33-inch tires.

Wildtrak (two-door costs $50,370; four-door costs $52,865): This is what the Rubicon trim is to the Jeep Wrangler — the most off-road-focused version in the lineup. The Bronco Wildtrak comes standard with the 310-horsepower turbocharged V6 that is optional on all other models. Additional enhancements include the other trims’ Mid and Sasquatch packages, plus beadlock wheels and 35-inch tires.

First Edition (two-door costs $60,800; four-door costs $64,995). This range-topping Bronco will only be available the first model year of production. It includes many features that are optional on other trims, including the Sasquatch and Lux packages, a 12-inch touchscreen, an upgraded sound system, leather upholstery, and a suite of advanced safety systems. There’s also unique interior trim and First Edition graphics and badges.

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