Final 2019 Porsche 911 Speedster sells for $500k, raises $1M for coronavirus relief

The final 991-generation Porsche 911, a 2019 911 Speedster, sold for $500,000 on Wednesday in an online charity auction organized by RM Sotheby’s for coronavirus relief. Porsche’s North American arm matched the hammer price, raising $1 million for the United Way’s Covid-19 Fund.

The auction began on April 15 and ended on the 22nd. A total of 32 bids were received, which is more than is typical for an RM Sotheby’s online auction. The total price was actually $550,000 including the buyer’s premium that the auction house collects, but RM Sotheby’s will also donate a “significant portion” of the buyer’s premium to the United Way for coronavirus relief.

The car was one of 1,948 2019 911 Speedsters built. Also included in the sale were a bespoke watch from Porsche Design, with a strap made from the same cognac leather used in the 911 Speedster, and the final car’s chassis number etched onto its casing.

Porsche also included a book documenting the car’s build process, which was completed in December 2019.

Finally, the winning bidder will also get a behind-the-scenes tour of Porsche’s development center in Weissach, Germany, as a guest of Frank-Steffen Walliser and Andreas Preuninger, the respective heads of Porsche’s 911 and GT car programs.

The 2019 911 Speedster was launched to mark the 70th anniversary of the registration of the first Porsche sports car, a 356, in 1948, hence the production run of 1,948 units. The Speedster is mechanically related to the 911 GT3, but features a unique 4.0-liter flat-6 that produces 502 horsepower and can rev to 9,000 rpm. Porsche quotes 0-60 mph in 3.8 seconds and a top speed of 192 mph.

The Speedster started at $275,750, which didn’t stop the entire production run from selling out quickly. Customers could also order a Heritage Design Package for an additional $24,510. This package, which is included on the final car, adds a retro livery and other design cues referencing the original 356 Speedster of the 1950s.

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